Stainless steel factoryOn Tuesday, July 25, President Trump spoke with The Wall Street Journal, mentioning that the administration would be taking its time on determining whether to restrict steel imports. Trump and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross announced in April that the Administration would be investigating the effects of steel and aluminum imports on national security under Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962. Although the law gives Commerce 270 days to make its recommendations, their self-imposed deadline on the report for steel was June 30, which came and went with no action.

Continue Reading Trump Administration Delays Findings on Section 232 Steel Investigation

Nowadays, the only thing that remains certain in the industry of domestic and global trade is the unpredictability of influential decisions made by the U.S. government and how those decisions will impact trading laws and regulations.

There has been much to say regarding Section 232 and related tariff concerns. On Husch Blackwell’s TMT Industry Insider you can find several blog posts we’ve published regarding these hot-button topics.

Additionally, Husch Blackwell is pleased to offer complimentary passes to the first 30 registrants for a very timely upcoming webinar: Trump’s Steel and Aluminum Tariffs: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly.

The webinar will focus on Trump’s steel and aluminum tariffs and provide insight on what lies ahead. It will be hosted on The Knowledge Group and will take place on Tuesday, June 26, 2018 at 12:00 p.m.-1:00 p.m. (ET) The webinar is led by Husch Blackwell Partner, Nithya Nagarajan and John Peterson, Partner at Neville Peterson LLP.

Register here.

 

By Alan Hoffman on September 12, 2016

Court stepsIn Izzarelli v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, 321 Conn. 172, 136 A.3d 1232 (2016), the Connecticut Supreme Court was called on by the United States Court of Appeals, Second Circuit, to consider whether the so-called “good tobacco” exception to strict liability of comment (i) to Section